Debunking the Myth of the “Good Old Days”: Sexism, Racism and the Working Class in Canada After WWII, Part Two

by Ryan Sparrow

Racialised and gendered work is a common feature of the development of capitalism. The need for a super-exploitable vulnerable group of workers is beneficial to the big business community as it helps bring about a much lower floor of wages and working conditions.

St Catharines auto plant workers, 1944

In the post-war era, the overt racism and overt gender discrimination of workers was still around, although less prevalent.  Institutionalized racism and sexism, however, was still very widely practised.  Racialised and gendered labour therefore represented a super-exploited strata of the working class in the post-war era. This article continues from the historic framework of analysis and presents some examples. Continue reading

Debunking the Myth of the “Good Old Days”: Sexism, Racism and the Working Class in Canada After WWII, Part One

by Ryan Sparrow

Racialised and gendered work is a common feature of the development of capitalism. The need for a super-exploitable vulnerable group of workers is beneficial to the big business community as it helps bring about a much lower floor of wages and working conditions.

The historic 1945 Ford Strike in Windsor

In the post-war era, the overt racism and overt gender discrimination of workers was still around, although less prevalent.  Institutionalized racism and sexism, however, was still very widely practised.  Racialised and gendered labour therefore represented a super-exploited strata of the working class in the post-war era. Continue reading

What Has Been Put on Hold by the Prorogation of Ontario’s Provincial Parliament?

Rebel Youth

Here is a sampling:

  • A bill allowing HST rebates for home heating;
  • A bill to boost security at courts and nuclear plants;

Former Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty

  • A bill requiring school boards to introduce concussion-prevention practices;
  • A bill banning people under 18 from using tanning beds;
  • A bill to amalgamate Ontario’s three power authorities; Continue reading

CLC Welcomes Decision to Create New Union: Georgetti Says CEP, CAW Choosing Best Way Forward

Canadian Labour Congress

The President of the Canadian Labour Congress has welcomed a decision by the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada to create a new union along with the Canadian Auto Workers.

CLC President Ken Georgetti addresses delegates to the B.C. Federation of Labour’s 50th Convention.

“The members and leaders of the CEP and CAW are choosing the best way forward for their unions,” Georgetti says.

Delegates to the annual CEP convention meeting in the City of Québec voted in favour of a proposal to create the new union. Delegates to a CAW convention had earlier voted unanimously in favour of the same proposal at their August 2012 convention in Toronto. Continue reading

Poll Results on Satisfaction with Capitalism and Multiparty Democracy

Twenty+ years after the Soviet Union’s implosion under Gorbachev’s disastrous policies, Russians, Ukrainians, and Lithuanians are disgusted with the direction of their countries and disillusioned with multi-party politics and “the free market”. The Pew Research Centre Poll tells the story of radical disillusionment:

Russians, Ukrainians, and Lithuanians indicate they want a deepened, real democracy, with a fair judiciary and free media. However, they do not believe their post-socialist countries have delivered these institutions.

(And since the beginning of the Global Economic Crisis the disquiet with the global financial system has gone viral. According to the result of a 27-nation survey published in the German magazine Der Spiegel 2 years ago, only 11 percent reported being content with the capitalist system’s functioning. Further, 23 percent believe the free market economy is inherently flawed: Only in the US and in Pakistan were at least one in five happy with the current economic system.)

Al-Jaafari: Blatant Foreign Meddling in Syria’s Affairs Hinders Efforts for National Reconciliation and Comprehensive National Dialogue

by R. Milhem, F.Allafi, H. Zain and H. Sabbagh

Syria’s Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Dr. Bashar al-Jaafari, stressed the need for the Security Council (UNSC) to assume its responsibilities in implementing its resolutions regarding the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian and the Syrian Golan territories and regarding the issue of the Palestinian refugees.

Dr. Bashar al-Jaafari representing Syria at the UN

In the statement of the Syrian Arab Republic during the UNSC’s session on Monday night which was dedicated to the situation in the Middle East, al-Jaafari called upon the UNSC to assume its responsibilities, deal seriously with the continuation of the Israeli occupation to the Syrian Golan for 45 years, and implement UN Resolution No. 497 for 1981 which was issued unanimously and that considers the Israeli decision of annexing the occupied Golan as null and void with no legal effect, along with all Israeli relevant decisions.

Al-Jaafari said “The UNSC’s refraining from shouldering its responsibilities in this regard for decades confirms the existence of an eclectic and selective view by some of the member states in the Council regarding the implementation of its resolutions when they are related to Israel.” Continue reading

The Vice Presidential Debate and National Liberation

Author Unknown

There were two discernible moments in last night’s Vice Presidential debate that I thought were the most telling and most important moments we’ve seen in the two confrontations between the Obama-Biden and Romney-Ryan tickets. It wasn’t Congressman Ryan’s brilliant swipe at Vice President Biden’s long history of gaffes. It wasn’t Biden’s blistering attack on Romney’s 47% comment or his rock-solid defense of the Administration’s tax plan, in which he pointed out that 97% of small business owners don’t make more than $250,000 per year. These were all interesting moments, although by my own standards of debate – cultivated from four years of competing in high school and three years of coaching in college – Biden won the arguments.

Libya’s Col. Muammar Gaddafi (left) and Syria’s Bashar al-Assad (right)

But the moment I’m referring to was more important than all of that. I get that this election is about jobs and the economy in the minds of voters so I don’t use ‘important’ to mean ‘election-altering’. I mean that for progressive-minded people, organizers, and activists in this country, these two moments told us a lot more about the country we live in and the policies we organize against than anything said on the campaign trail.

The two moments I’m referring to were the Libyan embassy question at the beginning of the debate and the Syria question near the end. Continue reading