Fatuous, Dangerous, Utterly Irresponsible

by Eddie Ford

We call for the immediate legalisation of all drugs.

Few issues generate so much irrationality as the question of drugs. Rather we get tabloid-driven, moralistic sound and fury, where small things like facts and evidence are blindly ignored – indeed, themselves become objects of righteous condemnation. Naturally, the government – and, of course, the Tory government-in-waiting – is compelled to join the ‘anti-drugs’ mob, locked as it is into the unwinnable ‘war on drugs’, a prisoner of its own myths and desperate rhetoric.

Hence on becoming prime minister, Gordon Brown promptly – and stupidly – declared that cannabis was “lethal” and, following a media frenzy about the supposed dangers of ‘skunk’, insisted that cannabis be re-reclassified from its then current official governmental status as a class C drug back to the more ‘dangerous’ class B it had been prior to David Blunkett’s 2004 regrading (or downgrading). While the ‘anti-drugs’ Daily Mail was cock-a-hoop at this development, this Alice-in-Wonderland comment set the tone for the Brown administration’s thoroughly backward and reactionary approach to the whole issue – which, in just about every respect, has been more irrational than the one pursued by Blair or the previous Tory government (yes, including Margaret Thatcher). Continue reading

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Corporate Taxes: Now Is Not the Time for Ontario to Cut Them

Toronto Star editorial

Low corporate tax rates didn't stop Caterpillar from fleeing London, Ont.

Low corporate tax rates didn’t stop Caterpillar from fleeing London, Ont. ERIC LALMAND/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Ontario has a $16-billion deficit and since economic growth is projected to be slower than we’re used to, there is no easy way back to balance. No wonder public concern is mounting over how the Liberal government intends to raise revenues and reduce costs in its upcoming budget.

It’s a lot of ammunition for any opposition party to work with. And, this week, Progressive Conservative Leader Tim Hudak firmly picked his battleground: more tax cuts for big business. Continue reading