Why Don’t the Greek Communists Just Link Forces With the Radical Left Coalition?

by Johan Boyden

The political assessment of the Communist Party of Greece (which we posted here) deserves some introduction for our readers in Canada. Afterall, as Greece heads towards Sunday elections, all eyes seem to suddenly be turned to the volatile situation in the Hellenic Republic.

UPDATE: View the election results in graphic form and read the assessment of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Greece.

Progressive-minded people in Canada are optimistic. After years of hard struggle with countless general strikes and mass rallies, maybe these elections will hand a victory to political parties that identify with the left? Maybe they will demonstrate a different direction from austerity and economic crisis to the world?

There is also a certain renewed anxiety in the voices of the ruling class.  “We cannot have a Greek election determining the future of the global economy. That’s not fair to anybody,” Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper said recently. Today, Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney referenced Greece and the European situation to warn of more mass unemployment and ‘recession’ over here. Continue reading

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Greek Leftist Leader Alexis Tsipras: “It’s a War Between People and Capitalism”

by Helena Smith

Greece’s eurozone fate may now be in the hands of the 37-year-old political firebrand and his Syriza party.

Alexis Tsipras

Alexis Tsipras in his office at the Greek parliament building on Friday. He says Greece has been used as a guinea pig for the rest of Europe. Photograph: Martin Godwin

“I don’t believe in heroes or saviours,” says Alexis Tsipras, “but I do believe in fighting for rights … no one has the right to reduce a proud people to such a state of wretchedness and indignity.”

The man who holds the fate of the euro in his hands – as the leader of the Greek party willing to tear up the country’s €130bn (£100bn) bailout agreement – says Greece is on the frontline of a war that is engulfing Europe.

A long bombardment of “neo-liberal shock” – draconian tax rises and remorseless spending cuts – has left immense collateral damage. “We have never been in such a bad place,” he says, sleeves rolled up, staring hard into the middle distance, from behind the desk that he shares in his small parliamentary office. “After two and a half years of catastrophe, Greeks are on their knees. The social state has collapsed, one in two youngsters is out of work, there are people leaving en masse, the climate psychologically is one of pessimism, depression, mass suicides.” Continue reading

Capitalist Lifeboats Will Come “At Some Point…”

The IMF reports that Greek incomes have dropped by about 10 per cent since 2010, hours worked have dropped by 7 per cent, and unemployment (especially youth unemployment) is skyrocketing.

That isn’t good enough for Greece’s lenders, who are looking to the Greek government to engineer a further direct assault on the country’s minimum wage, labour standards, pensions and collective bargaining with the aim of imposing a substantial further drop in income. Continue reading

The Economic Basis of the Withering Away of the State: The State and Revolution

by Vladimir Lenin

Marx explains this question most thoroughly in his Critique of the Gotha Programme (letter to Bracke, May 5, 1875, which was not published until 1891 when it was printed in Neue Zeit, vol. IX, 1, and which has appeared in Russian in a special edition). The polemical part of this remarkable work, which contains a criticism of Lassalleanism, has, so to speak, overshadowed its positive part, namely, the analysis of the connection between the development of communism and the withering away of the state.

1. Presentation of the Question by Marx

From a superficial comparison of Marx’s letter to Bracke of May 5, 1875, with Engels’ letter to Bebel of March 28, 1875, which we examined above, it might appear that Marx was much more of a “champion of the state” than Engels, and that the difference of opinion between the two writers on the question of the state was very considerable.

Engels suggested to Bebel that all chatter about the state be dropped altogether, that the word “state” be eliminated from the programme altogether and the word “community” substituted for it. Engels even declared that the Commune was long a state in the proper sense of the word. Yet Marx even spoke of the “future state in communist society”, i.e., he would seem to recognize the need for the state even under communism.

But such a view would be fundamentally wrong. A closer examination shows that Marx’s and Engels’ views on the state and its withering away were completely identical, and that Marx’s expression quoted above refers to the state in the process of withering away. Continue reading

The Nation: Marxism and the National Question

by Joseph Stalin

What is a nation?

A nation is primarily a community, a definite community of people.

This community is not racial, nor is it tribal. The modern Italian nation was formed from Romans, Teutons, Etruscans, Greeks, Arabs, and so forth. The French nation was formed from Gauls, Romans, Britons, Teutons, and so on. The same must be said of the British, the Germans and others, who were formed into nations from people of diverse races and tribes.

Thus, a nation is not a racial or tribal, but a historically constituted community of people.

On the other hand, it is unquestionable that the great empires of Cyrus and Alexander could not be called nations, although they came to be constituted historically and were formed out of different tribes and races. They were not nations, but casual and loosely-connected conglomerations of groups, which fell apart or joined together according to the victories or defeats of this or that conqueror.

Thus, a nation is not a casual or ephemeral conglomeration, but a stable community of people.

But not every stable community constitutes a nation. Continue reading

With Tenacity, Optimism, Militancy to Decisively Strengthen the KKE

Communist Party of Greece (KKE)

Aleka Papariga, General Secretary of the Central Committee of the KKE, held a press conference 18/4 on the enormous social issue of unemployment, which now affects every Greek family, as unemployment according to official statistics has surpassed 21%, while amongst young people it is over 50%.

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As A. Papariga stressed, in the election period the question of unemployment will be used by the other parties as a theatre piece, and they foster illusions that investments which support the profitability of capital will reduce unemployment and raise wages and pensions. The KKE has a unified proposal for struggle. Continue reading

Solidarity to the struggle of the Greek people! – Shame on the Government of Finland!

Yrjö Hakanen, Chairman of the CP of Finland – 18.02.2012

Greece is to be made into a precedent of how the bill of the financial crisis is to be paid by the working and poor people. At the same time the crisis is used to attack workers’ rights and democracy, to carry out privatization and to implement a huge income transfer in favour of big capital. The perpetrators are the same representatives of financial capital, of the European Union and of the governments, who are to blame for the crisis.

The Communist Party of Finland expresses its solidarity with the Greek workers and people, with the trade union movement and left-wing forces who struggle against the austerity policies pursued by the European Union, the International Monetary Fund and the plutocracy.

The CPF condemns the participation of the Government of Finland in such policies which crush the democratic rights of the Greek people, reduce the wages by half of the pre-crisis levels, operate drastic cuts in social security, privatize public services and generate growing unemployment and poverty. It is a shame that such policies are supported within the Finnish government by leaders of the Social Democratic Party, the Left Alliance and the Greens Party, too.

We Communists are on Saturday 18 February in Helsinki part and parcel of the demonstration of solidarity and support for the struggle of the Greek people: “We all are Greeks, the struggle is common. We have had enough of austerity and of the oligarchy!”

Solidarity to the Greek workers and people.

Solidarity to the Greek workers and people. / Arjo Suonperä