Communist Party and Young Communist League Demonstrate in Support of Six Nations

by Rick Gunderman

On Saturday, April 28, approximately 400 people marched through the small town of Caledonia, Ontario to demand justice for the Six Nations of the Grand River Territory.

Many of those marching came from other parts of the province, with a significant presence from Toronto and Hamilton. Many were also members of the Six Nations or non-Native residents of Caledonia and the surrounding area.

Charles Yin, left, and Rick Gunderman demonstrate in solidarity with Six Nations

The demonstration was peaceful, positive and vibrant. A grand coalition of people from all backgrounds and walks of life came to express solidarity with Six Nations.

The demonstrators gathered in Edinburgh Square, on the north side of the Grand River. While gathering there, several officers from the Ontario Provincial Police skulked through the crowd with video cameras, recording participants from the pro-Six Nations side. When one officer came across two comrades from Hamilton’s Communist Party and Young Communist League, he stopped and stood recording for several minutes. Continue reading

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The Economic Basis of the Withering Away of the State: The State and Revolution

by Vladimir Lenin

Marx explains this question most thoroughly in his Critique of the Gotha Programme (letter to Bracke, May 5, 1875, which was not published until 1891 when it was printed in Neue Zeit, vol. IX, 1, and which has appeared in Russian in a special edition). The polemical part of this remarkable work, which contains a criticism of Lassalleanism, has, so to speak, overshadowed its positive part, namely, the analysis of the connection between the development of communism and the withering away of the state.

1. Presentation of the Question by Marx

From a superficial comparison of Marx’s letter to Bracke of May 5, 1875, with Engels’ letter to Bebel of March 28, 1875, which we examined above, it might appear that Marx was much more of a “champion of the state” than Engels, and that the difference of opinion between the two writers on the question of the state was very considerable.

Engels suggested to Bebel that all chatter about the state be dropped altogether, that the word “state” be eliminated from the programme altogether and the word “community” substituted for it. Engels even declared that the Commune was long a state in the proper sense of the word. Yet Marx even spoke of the “future state in communist society”, i.e., he would seem to recognize the need for the state even under communism.

But such a view would be fundamentally wrong. A closer examination shows that Marx’s and Engels’ views on the state and its withering away were completely identical, and that Marx’s expression quoted above refers to the state in the process of withering away. Continue reading