Terrorists Killed, Weapons Storehouses Destroyed…Border Infiltration Attemtps Foiled

English Bulletin from the Syrian Arab News Agency

PROVINCES, (SANA)- The Syrian armed forces continued pursuing the terrorists mercenaries who intimidated the civilians in a number of neighborhoods in the city of Aleppo, helped by the citizens who have been informing the authorities of the movement and whereabouts of the terrorists.

Syrian Arab News Agency photo

A source in Aleppo province on Saturday told SANA reporter that the armed forces confronted an armed terrorist group near the Faculty of Sciences in Aleppo inflicting big losses among the terrorists and arresting others.

The source added that a unit of the army killed and wounded dozens of terrorists near the Radio area in Aleppo city.

The armed forces continued chasing the terrorist groups out of Saif al-Dawleh area inflicting heavy losses upon their members.

The told SANA that the authorities have seized large amounts of weapons and ammunition in the course of their pursuit of the terrorists and dismantled a number of explosive devices. Continue reading

Advertisements

Capitalism: A Ghost Story

by Arundhati Roy

Rockefeller to Mandela, Vedanta to Anna Hazare…. How long can the cardinals of corporate gospel buy up our protests?

CORBIS (FROM OUTLOOK, MARCH 26, 2012)

Antilla the Hun Mukesh Ambani’s 27-storey home on Altamont Road. Its bright lights, say the neighbours, have stolen the night.

Is it a house or a home? A temple to the new India, or a warehouse for its ghosts? Ever since Antilla arrived on Altamont Road in Mumbai, exuding mystery and quiet menace, things have not been the same. “Here we are,” the friend who took me there said, “Pay your respects to our new Ruler.”

Antilla belongs to India’s richest man, Mukesh Ambani. I had read about this most expensive dwelling ever built, the twenty-seven floors, three helipads, nine lifts, hanging gardens, ballrooms, weather rooms, gymnasiums, six floors of parking, and the six hundred servants. Nothing had prepared me for the vertical lawn—a soaring, 27-storey-high wall of grass attached to a vast metal grid. The grass was dry in patches; bits had fallen off in neat rectangles. Clearly, Trickledown hadn’t worked. Continue reading