The Vulgarisation of Marxism by the Opportunists: The State and Revolution

by Vladimir Lenin

The question of the relation of the state to the social revolution, and of the social revolution to the state, like the question of revolution generally, was given very little attention by the leading theoreticians and publicists of the Second International (1889-1914). But the most characteristic thing about the process of the gradual growth of opportunism that led to the collapse of the Second International in 1914 is the fact that even when these people were squarely faced with this question they tried to evade it or ignored it.

In general, it may be said that evasiveness over the question of the relation of the proletarian revolution to the state–an evasiveness which benefited and fostered opportunism–resulted in the distortion of Marxism and in its complete vulgarization.

To characterize this lamentable process, if only briefly, we shall take the most prominent theoreticians of Marxism: Plekhanov and Kautsky.

1. Plekhanov’ s Controversy with the Anarchists

Plekhanov wrote a special pamphlet on the relation of anarchism to socialism, entitled Anarchism and Socialism, which was published in German in 1894.

Georgi Plekhanov

In treating this subject, Plekhanov contrived completely to evade the most urgent, burning, and most politically essential issue in the struggle against anarchism, namely, the relation of the revolution to the state, and the question of the state in general! Continue reading

Ward Imbalance Underrepresents Less Affluent Residents in Hamilton

by John Neary

“While much of the commentary over Hamilton’s ward representation focuses on the urban/suburban split, the more glaring imbalance is in representation by income.”

Much of the recent commentary on the large differences in population between Hamilton wards – or, to put it differently, the large differences in voter representation – has once again focused on the “urban vs. suburban/rural” narrative.

This focus is a shame for several reasons, the first of which is that these divides aren’t as clear as we often think.

Is Ward 13 (Dundas) “suburban”? It’s called the “Valley Town”, not the “Valley Suburb”.

Is Ward 1 “urban” (Strathcona and Kirkendall) or suburban (West Hamilton to the Ancaster border)?

How about Ward 7, which stretches from the mountain brow all the way past Rymal Road?

More importantly, however, this narrative is unhelpful because it distracts from how the current ward system underrepresents our poorest and most vulnerable citizens. Continue reading

Bo’s Downfall Result of Inflated Sense of Influence

by Shan Renping

The case of Bo Xilai shows that officials should not overestimate their personal influence in China, or they will have the illusion of being above Party discipline and the law. If those who study China do not perceive this, they will misinterpret the country.

As a former member of the Political Bureau of the CPC Central Committee as well as the former Secretary of the CPC Chongqing Municipal Committee, Bo was in a high position with extensive power. As such a high- level official is being investigated, therewill undoubtedly be a blow to the region and authorities under his previous leadership.

But the impact will only be temporary. Personal influence and high rank will not shield wayward officials from punishment. A few high-level officials apparently misjudged and gambled on this fact. Continue reading